Peter A Allard School of Law

Cristie Ford

Professor and Associate Dean, Research and the Legal Profession
B.A. (Alberta), J.D. (Victoria), LL.M. (Columbia), JSD (Columbia)

Profile

Dr. Cristie Ford’s research focuses primarily on regulatory governance as it relates to international, US and Canadian financial and securities regulation. In recent years, her interests have expanded to include access to justice and governance issues related to the legal profession. Prior to joining UBC, Professor Ford practiced law at Guild Yule LLP in Vancouver and Davis Polk and Wardwell LLP in New York. She obtained her graduate degrees from Columbia Law School, where she also taught in a variety of capacities.

Professor Ford edited Regulation & Governance from 2012 through 2015 and now sits on its Executive Board, among other editorial and advisory boards. She has served on several occasions as a consultant to the Canadian Department of Finance, and her work has been cited by the Supreme Court of Canada in some of its leading cases. She has lectured across North America and in Europe, Australia, and Israel. She has been a Killam Faculty Research Fellow at UBC, a Plumer Research Fellow at St. Anne’s, Oxford University; and a Fernand Braudel Senior Research Fellow at the European University Institute. In 2015/2016 she received the faculty’s George Curtis Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence. Professor Ford is Associate Dean, Research and the Legal Profession, as of July 1, 2019.

Dr. Ford’s recent work concerns the relationship between innovation, regulation, and broader social values. The main argument in her book, Innovation and the State: Finance, Regulation, and Justice (Cambridge University Press: 2017), is that the single most profound and significant challenge facing regulation – not only today, but continually – is private sector innovation. Regulation is at the leading edge of politics and policy in ways that we do not always fully grasp. Financial regulation in particular is a crucial site for addressing domination in some of its most embedded and pernicious forms. The book describes a regulatory structure that can identify and respond better to innovation-related destabilization, while also staying attuned to the equality, justice, and fairness concerns that animate regulation in the first place. A summary is here; see book reviews on Penn’s Reg Review and the Modern Law Review. An earlier article in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science sets out the context for this work (with a response by Matthew Desmond).

Building on her work on innovation and regulation, Dr. Ford has recently transitioned into thinking about the ways in which innovation presents challenges and opportunities for access to justice, the law, and the legal profession. These interests have become urgent in the COVID era, as courts, legal education, and legal regulation struggle to evolve. Dr. Ford is working to help respond in her roles as Associate Dean for the Legal Profession; on the BC Attorney General’s Advisory Committee on the pandemic and justice; on the Law Society’s Futures Task Force; and on the Boards of A2JBC and CLEBC.

In related regulatory governance work, Professor Ford has written about responsive regulation and the challenge of “scaling up” (response by John Braithwaite here); about systemic risk regulation, in Canada (with Hardeep Gill) and in comparative perspective; about problems of incrementalism, regulatory capacity, and complexity in the design of financial regulation; about banking regulation and the incursion of fintech and “bigtech” players into banks’ traditional spaces; and (with Carol Liao) about the way in which structured finance has “shattered the atom” of property, with implications for corporate law and legal theory.

Professor Ford is also well-known for her work on principles-based regulation, especially in securities and financial regulation, both before and after the financial crisis. She has written about the limits of focusing on regulatory governance strategies on their own, without considering the “macro” and “micro” contexts within which regulation has to operate.

Professor Ford’s work on deferred prosecution agreements and corporate monitorships grapples with whether it is possible to design systems that can genuinely reform corporate ethical culture. She has considered corporate monitorships from a new governance perspective and, with David Hess from the University of Michigan, evaluated their effectiveness in practice (herehere, and here). See also her views in The New York Times’s Room for Debate page. In related work she has written about administrative law remedies, and novel remedies in the corporate corruption context (for Transparency International).

Publications

 

Cristie Ford
“Peter A. Allard School of Law Faculty News”
Full text: (2020) 78:2 Advocate 259-261

UBC Library Location
Cristie Ford
“A New Perspective on Some Familiar Corporate and Business Law Tools”
Full text: JOTWELL (July 8, 2019)
Cristie Ford
“How Much Do You Really Know About Fraud?”
Full text: JOTWELL (June 14, 2018)
Cristie Ford
“Innovation as a Challenge to Regulation”
Full text: Reg Rev (March 12, 2018)
Cristie Ford
“Remedies in Canadian Administrative Law: A Roadmap to a Parallel Legal Universe”
in Colleen M. Flood & Lorne Sossin, eds., Administrative Law in Context, 3rd ed.
Toronto: Emond Montgomery, 2018
pp. 43-85

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“Flexible Regulation Scholarship Blossoms and Diversifies: 1980-2012”
in Cristie Ford, Innovation and the State: Finance, Regulation, and Justice
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017
pp. 101-120

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
Innovation and the State: Finance, Regulation, and Justice
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017

UBC Library Location
Cristie Ford
“Peter A. Allard School of Law Faculty News”
Full text: (2017) 75:6 Advocate 881-883

UBC Library Location
Cristie Ford
“Plus ça Change”
Full text: JOTWELL (June 14, 2017)
Cristie Ford
“Sedimentary Innovation: How Regulation Should Respond to Incremental Change”
in Cristie Ford, Innovation and the State: Finance, Regulation, and Justice
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017
pp. 194-217

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“Concrete Suggestions Around Conflict Minerals and Corporate Supply Chains”
Full text: JOTWELL (May 31, 2016)
Cristie Ford
“Clayton Christensen comes to Wall Street”
Full text: JOTWELL (September 21, 2015)
David Johnston, Kathleen Rockwell & Cristie Ford
Canadian Securities Regulation , 5th ed.
Markham: LexisNexis, 2014

UBC Library Location
Cristie Ford
“Drama and Consequence in Accounting Standards Choice (Seriously)”
Full text: JOTWELL (June 20, 2014)
Cristie Ford
“Financial Innovation and Flexible Regulation: Destabilizing the Regulatory State”
Full text: (2014) 18 NC Banking Inst. Special Ed. 27-38
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie L. Ford
“Dogs and Tails: Remedies in Administrative Law”
in Colleen Flood & Lorne Sossin, eds., Administrative Law in Context, 2d ed.
Toronto: Emond Montgomery Publications, 2013
pp. 85-123

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“Innovation-Framing Regulation”
Full text: (2013) 649:1 Annals Am. Ac. Political & Soc. Sci. 76-97
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“Prospects for Scalability: Relationships and Uncertainty in Responsive Regulation”
Full text: (2013) 7 Reg & Governance 14-29
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“Regulating Financial Innovation”
Full text: JOTWELL (June 19, 2013)
Cristie Ford & Hardeep Gill
“A National Systemic Risk Clearinghouse?”
in Anita Anand, ed., What's Next for Canada? Securities Regulation after the Reference
Toronto: Irwin Law, 2012
pp. 145-184

UBC Library Location
Online Access (with full-text)
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“A Radical Perspective on the Mundane”
Full text: (2012) Jotwell: J Things We Like
Cristie Ford & David Hess
“Corporate Monitorships and New Governance Regulation: In Theory, in Practice, and in Context”
Full text: (2011) 33:4 Law & Pol'y 509-541
SSRN Abstract
Cristie Ford & Mary Condon
“Introduction to 'New Governance and the Business Organization'”
Full text: (2011) 33:4 Law & Pol'y 449-458
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“Macro- and Micro-Level Effects on Responsive Financial Regulation”
Full text: (2011) 44:3 U.B.C. L. Rev. 589-626

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford & Natasha Affolder
“Responsive Regulation in Context, Circa 2011”
Full text: (2011) 44:3 U.B.C. L. Rev. 463-473

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“New Governance in the Teeth of Human Frailty: Lessons from Financial Regulation”
Full text: 2010 1 Wis. L. Rev. 441-487
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford & Carol Liao
“Power Without Property, Still: Unger, Berle, and the Derivatives Revolution”
Full text: (2010) 33:4 Seattle U. L. Rev. 889-929

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“Principles-Based Securities Regulation in the Wake of the Global Financial Crisis”
Full text: (2010) 55:2 McGill L.J. 257-307

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford & David Hess
“Can Corporate Monitorships Improve Corporate Compliance?”
Full text: (2009) 34 J. Corp. L. 679-737

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie Ford
“Smart Enforcement: Trends and Innovations for Monitoring, Investigating and Prosecuting Corporate Corruption”
in Transparency International, ed., Global Corruption Report 2009 (in Chapter 5 - Towards a Comprehensive Business Integrity System: Checks and Balances in the Business Environment)
Cambridge: Transparency International, 2009
pp. 127-131

Online Access (with full-text)
David Hess & Cristie L. Ford
“Corporate Corruption and Reform Undertakings: A New Approach to an Old Problem”
Full text: (2008) 41 Cornell Int'l L.J. 307-346

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie L. Ford
“Dogs and Tails: Remedies in Administrative Law”
in Colleen Flood & Lorne Sossin, eds., Administrative Law in Context
Toronto: Emond Montgomery Publications, 2008
pp. 45-76

UBC Library Location
Cristie L. Ford
“How Should We Teach Securities Regulation in a Fast-Moving World?”, Book Review
Full text: (2008) 46:3 Can. Bus. L.J. 470-480

UBC Library Location
Cristie L. Ford
“New Governance, Compliance, and Principles-Based Securities Regulation”
Full text: (2008) 45:1 Am. Bus. L.J. 1-60

UBC Library Location
Cristie L. Ford
“Toward a New Model for Securities Law Enforcement”
Full text: (2005) 57:3 Admin. L. Rev. 757-828

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie L. Ford
“In Search of the Qualitative Clear Majority: Democratic Experimentalism and the Quebec Secession Reference”
Full text: (2001) 39:2 Alta. L. Rev. 511-560

UBC Library Location
Allard Research Commons
SSRN Paper
Cristie L. Ford
“Review of: The Rights Revolution by Michael Ignatieff”
Full text: (2001) 27:4 Can. Pub. Pol'y 516-520

UBC Library Location
Cristie Ford
“Bright Lines: Status, Recognition and Elusive Nature of Aging”
Full text: (1996) 2 Rev. Current L. & L. Reform 4-7
Ford Profile

Organization Affiliations

  • Dean's Office
  • Centre for Business Law
  • Centre for Feminist Legal Studies

Research Interests

  • Administrative law and regulatory governance
  • Banking and finance law
  • Courts, litigation and access to justice
  • Jurisprudence, legal theory, and critical studies
  • Legal ethics and the legal profession

What if one of the greatest challenges that law, and regulation, faces is human innovation? How do we even start to think about that problem?


Peter A. Allard School of Law UBC Crest The official logo of the University of British Columbia. Urgent Message An exclamation mark in a speech bubble. Arrow An arrow indicating direction. Caret A month-view page from a calendar. Caret An arrowhead indicating direction. Contact A page from a rolodex. Facebook The logo for the Facebook social media service. Information The letter 'i' in a circle. Instagram The logo for the Instagram social media service. Instagram An arrow exiting a rectangle. Linkedin The logo for the LinkedIn social media service. Mail An envelope. Minus A minus sign. Telephone An antique telephone. Play A media play button. Plus A plus symbol indicating more or the ability to add. Rss The logo for the Reddit social media service. Rss A symbol with radiating bars indicating an RSS feed. Search A magnifying glass. Twitter The logo for the Twitter social media service. Youtube The logo for the YouTube video sharing service.